The Purple Testament
Time it was, and what a time it was, it was,
A time of innocence. A time of confidences.
Long ago it must be, I have a photograph.
Preserve your memories, they're all that's left you.
The Purple Testament
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"I am overwhelmed with things I ought to have written about and never found the proper words."
Virginia Woolf, Diaries Volume One 1915-1919 (via larmoyante)
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lilkimbra:

BILLBOARD TOTALLY MIKE WAZOWSKI’D MOTHER TONY’S FACE FKDISJAHDISJSJD NOOOOO
lilkimbra:

BILLBOARD TOTALLY MIKE WAZOWSKI’D MOTHER TONY’S FACE FKDISJAHDISJSJD NOOOOO
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Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)

Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)

Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)

Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)

Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)

Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)

Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)

Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)

Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)

Joan found Shirley MacLaine’s character in the film deeply sad, passed around among the men in her office “like a plate of canapés.” As with so many other moments like this on Mad Men, Joan doesn’t seem to realize she’s speaking of herself as readily as the person she thinks she’s talking about. But this is clear by episode’s end. As the two get in the elevator to head down, Bert asks her to push the button for the lobby, and the connection between Joan and the movie character is clear: Both have wasted some part of themselves on men who, fundamentally, don’t love them, because they’re hoping for something better out of it and simply not finding it. And from the look on Joan’s face, she gets this just as well. (x)
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hannibaalecter:

Mads Mikkelsen as Lucas after Thomas Vinterberg’s attempt at making him ‘less pretty’
hannibaalecter:

Mads Mikkelsen as Lucas after Thomas Vinterberg’s attempt at making him ‘less pretty’
hannibaalecter:

Mads Mikkelsen as Lucas after Thomas Vinterberg’s attempt at making him ‘less pretty’
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"Instead of the people inside of the place trying to help, or whatever. They wanted to take pictures as well, and that’s when I started crying. When I thought, you know what, you’re a Mom.. why are you asking to take my picture right now? And you see that i’m crying. Are you that ignorant?"

"Instead of the people inside of the place trying to help, or whatever. They wanted to take pictures as well, and that’s when I started crying. When I thought, you know what, you’re a Mom.. why are you asking to take my picture right now? And you see that i’m crying. Are you that ignorant?"
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hughdancydance:

femininewritings:

fkef:

king-of-aces:

thickienicki:

kobetyrant:

Britney is younger than Bey…

white people age like milk lol

Lmao

yeah. the stress of having your parents financially dependent on you since childhood, learning disabilities, mental illness, two divorces, and drug and alcohol abuse will age you. 
not to say bey has had it easier since you know, racism. but bey definitely has class privilege and as far as we know, health/ability privilege over britney. but yeah, go on and say how poorly britney has aged. It’s not like she’s been working and paying her family’s bills since she was like 15.

I have to agree on this…it’s not fair to make racial comments about one woman in comparison to another. As women, we need to be trying to cooperate with each other, not tear each other down. It only perpetuates an endless damaging cycle, in my humble opinion.

Not to mention the fact that Beyonce, the woman who stood in front of the word Feminist in big letters on national television, probably would be really upset to see that people are saying things like this. 
Also 

She looks just fine to me. 
hughdancydance:

femininewritings:

fkef:

king-of-aces:

thickienicki:

kobetyrant:

Britney is younger than Bey…

white people age like milk lol

Lmao

yeah. the stress of having your parents financially dependent on you since childhood, learning disabilities, mental illness, two divorces, and drug and alcohol abuse will age you. 
not to say bey has had it easier since you know, racism. but bey definitely has class privilege and as far as we know, health/ability privilege over britney. but yeah, go on and say how poorly britney has aged. It’s not like she’s been working and paying her family’s bills since she was like 15.

I have to agree on this…it’s not fair to make racial comments about one woman in comparison to another. As women, we need to be trying to cooperate with each other, not tear each other down. It only perpetuates an endless damaging cycle, in my humble opinion.

Not to mention the fact that Beyonce, the woman who stood in front of the word Feminist in big letters on national television, probably would be really upset to see that people are saying things like this. 
Also 

She looks just fine to me. 
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n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
n-nightingale:

Working in customer service
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